MacEwen

Clan MacEwen is a Highland Scottish clan. The clan does not have a chief recognized by Lord Lyon King of Arms and as such the clan can be considered an Armigerous clan. The principle clan with the name MacEwen was Clan MacEwen of Otter that was centred on the shores of Loch Fyne in Argyll. The MacEwens of Otter’s traditional ancestry is entwined with several local clans such as Clan Lamont, Clan Maclachlan, Clan MacNeil of Barra, and the MacSweens, all claim descent from Anrothan O’Neill, who left Ireland for Kintyre in the 11th century. All of these clans can claim a further decent from the legendary Niall Noigíallach, High King of Ireland, who lived from the mid 4th century to early 5th century. In the 15th century the MacEwens of Otter lost their lands to the Campbells, and since then the line of chiefs has been untraced. The MacEwens were then known as a broken clan (landless) and followed Clan Campbell.

 

 

History

 

 

Clan MacEwen of Otter

The traditional ancestry of the MacEwens of Otter gives the clan a descent from an Irish prince named Anrothan O’Neill. The MacEwens of Otter along with several local clans such as Clan Lamont, Clan Maclachlan, Clan MacNeil of Barra, and the MacSweens, all claim descent from Anrothan O’Neill, who left Ireland for Kintyre in the 11th century. From this descent the clan can claim a further decent from the legendary Niall Noigíallach, High King of Ireland, who lived from the mid 4th century to early 5th century.

Their castle was located on Loch Fyne on the rocky shore near Kilfinan. In 1431–2, during the reign of James I of Scotland, Sween MacEwen of Otter resigned the destination of the Barony of Otter to the heir of the chief of Clan Campbell, after which on Sweens death the barony passed into the hands of the Campbells. From that time on with the loss of their land the MacEwens as a broken clan were dependants on Clan Campbell. Since the death of Sween the line of chiefs of the MacEwens of Otter have been untraced. In an Act of Parliament of 1602 the MacEwens are listed beside the lMacLachlans and McNeils, as vassals of the Earl of Argyll and answerable to him for their behaviour.

General Wade’s statement of the Highland forces engaged in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715 lists the Mac Ewens of the Isle of Skye with 150 men.

 

 

Clan profile

      Crest badge: the crest badge is usually made up of the chief’s heraldic crest and motto,

                        Crest: The trunk of an oak tree sprouting Proper.

                        Motto: Reviresco (translation from Latin: “I grow strong again”).

The modern crest badge of Clan MacEwen is derived from the crest and motto within the Arms of the McEwen Baronets. These McEwens held lands in Bardrochat in Carrick. The McEwen Baronets may not have any connection with Clan MacEwen of Otter.

 

 

Tartan

In the sixteenth century the MacEwens were a broken clan, which was absorbed by the Campbells, this tartan is made to resemble the Campbell of Loudon tartan.

 

 

Category posts

Search the Information Centre.

Need help? See our Search Tips